1969 Dodge D200 Power Wagon

 

This time I’m going to let Evan Yates tell the story on this truly amazing build we completed in 2016 and took to SEMA that year. The exerts below were taking from an article he wrote for “Truck Stop” on November 23,2016. You can read more of Evans article’s at http://www.thedrive.com/author/evan-yates

Time Warp's venture into custom vehicles began three years ago when they merged a 1956 Divco milk truck with a 2014 Ram 1500. The shop not only brought over the new chassis and powertrain to the vintage Divco, but also the complete interior including the dash and seats. This project birthed a side business where the team would locate classic rigs and combine them with their contemporary counterparts.

What sets this particular build apart from other’s attempts is the extent in which the truck was modernized. Never before had a classic Power Wagon been transformed to this magnitude.

Even if you’re not familiar with these trucks (not many are), one of the most noticeable additions is the Mega Cab extension behind the rear doors. This additional space is equivalent to the modern Mega Cab allowing for additional legroom and storage. In this instance, the extra real estate also allowed Time Warp Customs to incorporate the custom exhaust stacks into the cab.
Underneath the vintage shell lies a modern 2015 RAM 3500 dually chassis. A custom bed was fabricated to accommodate the additional wheels and the floor received a unique wood finish. The front and rear of the Power Wagon were equipped with Kelderman Alpha Series bumpers. The front bumper also features a Warn winch and Factor 55 fairlead and safety thimble.
What truly makes this truck the most unique classic Power Wagon on the planet is the seamless integration of the modern interior into the cabin. Along with Audition Audio of Cumming, GA who did most of the heavy lifting when it came to interior fabrication and integration, Time Warp Customs pulled off an immaculate transformation. All the factory RAM features remain functional and from behind the wheel, it’s difficult to detect the difference between old and new.

1987 GMC (square body) Crew Cab

Who doesn’t like the 80’s GM squire body pick-ups. Back than a 4-door, 4x4 pick up truck was a rare thing to see. They are even scarcer today and when you do see one they have seen their better days.

A customer of ours found one in decent shape and brought it to us to transform. He didn’t want it restored to factory specs. He had just picked up his 1969 Dodge Power Wagon from us and wanted us to do the same thing to his new found 1987 GMC. This time we agreed that a newer model GM 2500/3500 with a Duramax power plant and an Allison transmission should do the trick.

These two trucks measured out petty well and the two were mated together with relative ease. (About 650 man-hours, not counting paint and interior work). We shortened the frame, moved a few things around under the hood, and repositioned the gas tank, body mounts, exhaust and so on.

The integration of the classic cab with their short dashes onto a modern firewall and dash is always the toughest part of these builds. You want the transformation to look seamless while maintaining all the functionality of the modern donor, yet you need to remove 6-10” of the modern dash for seat positioning work out. How we do that is our secret. Why we spend countless hours on this step is evident as soon as you open the door. The classic cab is seamlessly integrated to the modern donor, which in this case was a 2010 Chevy 2500 low mileage truck.

Like all of our Time Warp Custom builds we upgraded the brakes, replaced all ware parts on the engine, steering and installed a 4” suspension lift to support the American Force 20x12 wheels with 37x13.5 inch Toyo tires. We fabed custom bumpers front and rear, added a Warn winch, changed all the lights to LED’s and added a spray in bed liner.

We spent it out for paint and interior preformed our shake down and delivered to our customer in June 2017.

 

1974 Ford Bronco Project 1 SOLD!

 

For a build like this, we needed two donor vehicles: the classic (1974 Ford Bronco) and the modern (2008 Ford Explorer). We purchased the Bronco for the body. The Explorer was really the heart of the project with 68,600 miles on it. We changed all the fluids, belts, and hoses; upgraded the brakes with new drilled and slotted front and rear rotors and pads; installed new CV axles, new plugs, and air filters; and installed a new MBRP exhaust system (new suspension, wheels/tires, and lights as well).
We kept as much of the functionality offered in the Explorer as we could. The dash and steering wheel functions, four-wheel drive, seating and chassis of the vehicle remained Explorer. We redid the interior with a custom design to blend the new and old. (We documented the build so you can see what went into the integration of these two Fords. It was more than just taking off the Explorer body and putting the Bronco body on the Explorer chassis.)
After a few days of measurement and planning, we started out by cutting away the parts of the Explorer that we were not going to need. What remained was the complete chassis including the frame, suspension, and running gear. On the inside, we kept the floor pan, firewall, dash, steering and pedal assembly, center console, and the front and third row seating. Before we started to fit the Bronco body, we needed to address the differences in the two wheelbases: the Explorer was 32” longer and 2” wider than the Bronco was. The width was resolved with trimming and installing front and rear fender flares. (This also supported the added room we needed to fit 35” tires.)
To address the wheelbase issue, we cut the frame and removed the unneeded inches. Next, we sleeved it and welded it back together. Then we shortened the lines, exhaust, and the rear driveshaft. Additionally, we had to modify the gas tank and move it from the driver’s side of the Explorer to the rear.
It was then time to start fitting the Bronco body. We started with the front cowl and windshield. To get the positioning we were looking for, we needed to cut the Explorer’s dash and reroute the heat and air ducts. After a few days of cutting and plumbing, we had our fixed point from which to build. Things under the hood fit but had to be repositioned a bit. We trimmed the inner fenders and built new inner fenders that we integrated with the Explorer’s chassis. Then we re-mounted the under- the-hood components along the new inner fender wells.
Although we tried to keep the Bronco look and feel as close to stock as possible, we liked the fact that the Explorer has front and rear independent suspension. However, we didn’t want to see the I/S as that would clearly show that this was not a traditional Bronco. We fabricated frame mounts and purchased custom Jeep XJ front and rear bumpers that would help obscure the axles. We finished the front end with a custom-built skid plate and a S/B 9.5K synthetic rope winch, providing an integrated look with the front grill. We then turned our attention to the engine compartment. We fabricated panels and purchased an engine dress up kit that helped complete the finished look and feel for which we were looking.
We feel that this new Bronco/Explorer should be as comfortable on the inside as possible. That’s why it was out with the old and in with the new including seats, door panels, headliner, floor mats and seat belt upgrades. Unlike the early broncos, we wanted to create a high end fit and finish with the comfort to drive on a long trip and use as a daily driver. All panels were sound dampened and covered with custom-made panels. The hardtop had a custom headliner and the wiper assembly was concealed. All new rubber weather stripping was installed on all windows and doors, as well as new felt for the door windows. We replaced all the glass and removed the vent windows on the doors with a single piece of glass.
Once it was completely dry fit, it was time to disassemble and send out for paint and interior. We had the paint and bodywork completed in pieces rather than assembled. This allowed us to paint all surfaces and reassemble with rubber gaskets and seals where required. The rear bumper was equipped with a multi-use swing out spare tire carrier. In addition to the full-size spare wheel and tire, we added a high lift jack and a five gallon Gerry can.

1974 FJ40-Cruiser

 

Our goal is to build Classic Conversion vehicles that our customers want to use as daily drivers. To provide an idea of what goes into a build like this, we documented our 1974 Toyota FJ40 / 2007 Toyota FJ Cruiser conversion. Too often we have found that even a fully restored vehicle doesn’t have a drive that compliments its looks. That’s because technology employed in the drivetrain, steering and safety feathers were often 50 plus years old. Even with all new parts, these vehicles still did not drive like today’s modern vehicles. (If you own a restored FJ40. you understand exactly what we’re saying.)
By combining the classic styling (the FJ40 body) with up-to-date automotive technology (the FJ Cruiser chassis), we created a custom-built 4-wheel drive classic that truly does provide a ride and drive that is comparable to its looks. For a build like this, we needed two donor vehicles: the classic (1974 FJ40) and the modern (2008 FJ Cruiser). We purchased the FJ40 for the body. The FJ Cruiser really served as the heart of the project with 90k miles on it. Because these Toyotas are known for their reliability and their longevity, the mileage was not a concern.
We changed all the fluids, belts, and hoses; upgraded the brakes with new drilled and slotted front and rear rotors and pads; installed new CV axles, new plugs, and a new air filter; and installed a new MBRP exhaust system. (Suspension, wheels/tires, and lights were also new.) We have kept as much of the functionality offered in the FJ Cruiser as possible. The dash and steering wheel functions, four-wheel drive, seating and drivability of the vehicle were all from the FJ Cruiser. We revamped the interior with a custom design that blended the modern and classic seamlessly. (We documented the build so you can see what went into the integration of these two FJs. It was more than just taking off the FJ Cruiser body and putting the FJ-40 body on the FJ Cruiser chassis.)
After a few days of measurement and planning, we started out by cutting away the parts of the FJ Cruiser that we were not going to need. What remained was the complete chassis including the frame, suspension, and running gear. In the interior, we kept the front floor pan, firewall, dash, steering and pedal assembly, center console and the front seating. Before we started to fit the FJ-40 body, we needed to address the differences in the two wheelbases. The FJ Cruiser was 16” longer and 6” wider than the FJ-40 was. The width was resolved with trimming and installing OE style front fenders and rear flares that were 3.5” wider than stock. (This also supported the added room we needed to fit 35” tires and a 2” lift kit.) To address the wheelbase issue, we cut the frame and removed the unneeded inches, we sleeved it and welded in back together, and then we shortened the lines, exhaust, and the rear driveshaft. We had to modify the gas tank and move it from the driver’s side of the Cruiser to the rear. As a result, we also needed to move the gas filler neck from the FJ40 stock location.
It was now time to start fitting the FJ-40 body. We started with the front cowl and windshield. To get the positioning for which we were looking, we needed to cut the FJ Cruiser dash and reroute the heat and air ducts. After a few days of cutting and plumbing, we had our front cowl positioned. This provided our start point from which to build. Next, we fabricated dash mounts to fix the FJ Cruiser dash to the FJ-40 front cowl. We then dry fitted our hood, fenders and grill. We changed out the FJ Cruiser radiator because it would not fit under the FJ-40 hood. We chose a Tacoma radiator to take its place. (We were able to use the FJ Cruiser’s AC condenser mounted in front of the new radiator.) We removed the engine fan for space reasons and installed a dual Flexalite electric fan and temperature sensor.
Things under the hood fit but had to be repositioned a bit. We trimmed the inner fenders and built new inner fenders that we integrated with the Cruiser’s chassis. Then we re-mounted the under-the-hood components along the new inner fender wells. (We moved the battery to a compartment that we build under the floor behind the driver’s seat because of space limitations.)
Although we tried to keep the FJ-40 look and feel as close to stock as possible, we felt that we could improve the original look of the long frame rail that hung out in front of the grill, so we created a new integrated frame horn that was designed to fit a Smitty Built Mod bumper with medium length end pieces. We culminated with a S/B 9.5K synthetic rope winch, providing an integrated look with the front grill.
With the front half of the integration complete, we turned our attention to the back section of the build. We decided to purchase an aluminum tub, tailgate, fenders, fender flares and side steps for this build. This allowed us to section the build and start with better than new components that would not rust over time. As we fit the rear section and installed the new aluminum fender flare, we got the width necessary to fit the aftermarket wheels and tires. We installed MHT 17” wheels with Toyo Open Country MT’s tires. We purchased an aluminum upper and lower tailgate to continue that better-than-new look and feel. (The lower tailgate had an integrated storage compartment.)
Finally, we filled the gas tank and started our 500-mile shake down. We put over 900 man hours into this build and have created a custom FJ40/Cruiser that looks and drives like a show room model.
With the FJ40/Cruiser complete, we turned our attention to the perfectly good FJ Cruiser body that we removed from the chassis. We decided that a great use for it would be to turn it into a camper that could be towed behind the FJ40/Cruiser conversion. (Think about it: looks like an FJ40 towing an FJ Cruiser. Pretty cool!) We build a frame and floor and integrated the body onto it. We mounted a V style toolbox in front of the body to house the generator and batteries that powered the camper. (The doors were wired so that the original power windows and door locks worked.)
Inside we reinstalled a much of the stock interior panels and built out all the amenities that you’d find in camper trailer. We installed a raised platform with a queen-sized memory foam mattress, added a window style AC unit and a flat screen TV with a built-in DVD player. In the rear we added a custom-built kitchen area which included a small refrigerator, microwave, a conduction hot plate and storage. We used LED lighting for the interior lights and used the original Cruiser taillights for our trailer rear highway lights (turn signals, brake lights and running lights). We culminated the build with a paint job and a set of wheels and tires that matched the FJ40/Cruiser’s.

1969 Series IIA Land Rover

For a build like this we need two donor vehicles, the Classic (1969 Land Rover Series IIA) and the Modern (2010 Land Rover LR4). We purchased the Series IIA from a diplomat in DC who brought the vehicle back from South Africa. The LR4 is really the heart of the project. We changed all the fluids, belts, and hoses,  installed new CV axles, new plugs, and air filters, and installed a new exhaust system. (Wheels/tires, and lights also new)

We have kept is much of the functionality offered in the LR4 as we could. The dash and steering wheel functions, four wheel drive, seating and drivability of the vehicle are all LR4. We’ve reworked some of the interior to work in the new body and have created trim panels to finish off a clean comfortable look and feel.

We have documented the build so you can see what went into the integration of these two Land Rovers. As you will see in the photos it wasn’t a matter of just taking off the LR4 body and putting the Series IIA body on the LR4 chassis. After a few days of measurement and planning we started out by cutting away the parts of the LR4 that we were not going to need. What remained was the complete Chassis including the frame, suspension, and running gear. On the inside we kept the floor pan, firewall, dash, steering and pedal assembly, center console, and all thee rows of seats and the rear Heat and AC system.

Before we start to fit the Series IIA body we need to address the differences in the two wheelbases. The LR4 is 23” longer and 02” wider then the Series IIA was. The width was resolved with trimming and installing front and rear fender flares. (This also supports the added room we needed to fit the larger tires.) To address the wheelbase issue we cut the frame and removed the unneeded inches, we sleeved it and welded in back together, than shortened lines, exhaust, and the rear driveshaft.

It was now time to start fitting the Series IIA body. We started with the front cowl and windshield. To get the positioning we were looking for, we need to cut the LR4 dash and reroute the heat and air ducts. After a few days of cutting and plumbing we had our fixed point to build from. Things under the hood fit but had to be repositioned a bit. We trimmed the inner fenders and built new inner fenders that we integrated with the LR4s chassis. To center the front wheels and make room for the complete LR4 engine bay including the stock radiator and AC condenser, we stretched the front end (fenders and hood) and reworked the front grill. Then we re-mounted the under the hood components along with the new inner fender wells and fabricated access panels on the flat tops of the fenders.

An ABR front bumper was mounted with a S/B 9500 winch with synthetic winch rope. The rear bumper came from Rovers North providing a clean classic look. We finished off the exterior with a full length roof rack make by Voyager Off Road. Although we kept a stock looking spare tire and wheel mounted to the hood, we also mounted a spare wheel and tire on the roof rack that match the ones on the Series IIA/LR4.

Once completely dry fit it was time to disassemble and send out for paint and interior.  We tried to keep the Series II look and feel as close to stock as possible. We would normally install power windows and door locks on our TWC conversions, but with the sliding door glass we left the stock configuration.

We feel that this new Series IIA/LR4 should be as comfortable on the inside as possible. That’s why we used much of the LR4 interior.  We reused the dash and all components except for the Audio system. (With the reduced depth of the original LR4 dash the head unit would know longer fit) We completed the fit and finish with custom panels and seamless integration between the two donors.

1955 Divco Milk Truck

This is the truck that got me convinced that I can't be the only person that wants a cool truck like this 1955 Divco to drive as good as it looks.

We were in the process of restoring this ex-milk truck when I realized that I was not going to drive a 4-cylinder  stand up  milk truck with a top speed of 45-50 MPH.

So I starting thinking about what I could do to improve the driving experence when I remembered seeing a 1958 Chevy Corvette body on a 2007 Corvette chassis.

​Because our core business focuses on lifting 4wd trucks, Jeeps, and SUV's I thought it would be synergistic to predominately build 4wd conversions.

I found a 2013 Ram 1500 4wd that rolled while being trailered to it's new home. The body was shot but we didn't need it anyway so we purchased it and began the conversion.Over 1000 man hours later we had a 1955 Divco integrated onto a 2013 Ram 1500 4wd chassis with all the comforts and driving characteristics the modern Ram offered.

(Unfortunately we did not document the process  on this one like the others as this was a personal build.)